Compost Competition

Bittles‘ Magazine | Quiz/Gewinnspiel

We have two copies of the excellent book Soul Love: 20 Years Compost Records to give away to two lucky readers. For a chance to win simply answer the following question:
 
Wir verlosen zwei Exemplare des großartigen Buchs Soul Love: 20 Years Compost Records – dazu muss nur die folgende (sehr einfache) Frage beantwortet werden:

Where is Compost based? – Wo is das Label Compost behimatet?

  1. Berlin.
  2. London.
  3. Munich.
  4. Me nan’s garden shed..

Send your answer to quiz@titel-kulturmagazin.net  where two lucky winners will receive a copy of  Soul Love: 20 Years Compost Records.

Schickt die Antwort per Mail (Betreff: Compost) an quiz@titel-kulturmagazin.net  Viel Glück!

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All entries must have Compost as their subject line, and should include your full name and address. The competition closes at midnight on Saturday the 24th October. The decision of the judges is final, and no cash alternative is available. Good luck!

Das Gewinnspiel endet am 24. Oktober. (Hier gibt es das notwendige Kleingedruckte zum Gewinnspiel)

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